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12
Feb . 2018

Gear up for March: Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month

  • by Julie Ferguson
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  • with 0 Comment
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  • in Medical conditions

March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month and it’s worth learning more about the risks and the prevention options: In 2018, more than 135,000 people will be diagnosed with this highly preventable disease. Colon cancer and rectal cancer can be prevented. Screening can detect colorectal cancer early — when it is most curable.

photo of two smiling couples over 50, who should have colorectal cancer screenings

All adults (men AND women) over the age of 50 are at risk for colorectal cancer and should be screened for polyps and cancer. People with higher risk (possibly because of another condition or a family history) should work with a doctor to develop a more individualized screening plan.

Risk factors

The American Cancer Society offers a comprehensive list of risk and prevention factors broken down into factors you can change, and ones that you cannot change.

Among those you can change are lifestyle related factors: Low physical activity, obesity, certain types of diets, smoking and heavy alcohol use might increase a person’s chance of developing colorectal polyps or colorectal cancer. The good news is that you can control these!

Among the most common factors you can’t change include:

  • Age – over 90% of those with colorectal cancer are age 50+
  • Personal history – people with a history of colon polyps, colon cancer, rectal cancer or other cancers may be at an increased risk
  • Inflmmatory Bowel Disorders – if you have ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s Disease or other bowel disorders, you are at a higher risk
  • Family history – Generally, screening for family members is recommended to begin 10 years prior to the survivor’s age of diagnosis
  • Type 2 Diabetes
  • Certain inherited conditions

Learn more about Prevention
While there is no sure way to prevent colorectal cancer, you there are certain risk factors you can control – and screenings are also a powerful way to prevent cancer. The importance of screenings can’t be over-emphasized:

“From the time the first abnormal cells start to grow into polyps, it usually takes about 10 to 15 years for them to develop into colorectal cancer. With regular screening, most polyps can be found and removed before they have the chance to turn into cancer. Screening can also find colorectal cancer early, when it is highly curable.”

Learn more about prevention and learn the American Cancer Society Recommendations for Colorectal Cancer Early Detection. The ACA offers recommended screenings and tests for people at average risk and for people at increased or high risk.

What else you can do: March 19 Dress in Blue Day

On Dress in Blue Day you can join our mission to end colorectal cancer within our lifetime. By wearing blue and raising funds to support the Colorectal Cancer Alliance, you and your peers become part of a nation of passionate allies, taking on this senseless killer.

16
Jan . 2018

February is American Heart Health Month

  • by Julie Ferguson
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  • with 0 Comment
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  • in Uncategorized

heart health infographic

Let Valentine’s Day be your reminder to think about your heart health. Since 1964, the American Heart Association has celebrated American Heart Month every February. Plus, the month also includes National Wear Red Day – Friday, February 2, 2018 – a special focus on women & heart disease.

In 1964, when the focus began, more than half the deaths in the U.S. were caused by cardiovascular disease. Here are a few current stats from the American Heart Association:

  • Cardiovascular diseases claim more lives each year than all forms of cancer and Chronic Lower Respiratory Disease combined.
  • About 2,200 Americans die of cardiovascular disease each day, an average of 1 death every 40 seconds.
  • Approximately every 40 seconds, an American will have a heart attack.About 790,000 people in the US have heart attacks each year. Of those, about 114,000 will die.
  • About 92.1 million American adults are living with some form of cardiovascular disease or the after-effects of stroke.

To educate the public,  American Heart Association promotes Life’s Simple 7 – measures have one unique thing in common: any person can make these changes, the steps are not expensive to take and even modest improvements to your health will make a big difference. Start with one or two. This simple, seven step list has been developed to deliver on the hope we all have–to live a long, productive healthy life.

Get your Heart Score and learn more about Life’s Simple 7.  The Life’s Simple 7 steps include a focus on ways to:

  • Manage Blood Pressure
  • Control Cholesterol
  • Reduce Blood Sugar
  • Get Active
  • Eat Better
  • Lose Weight
  • Stop Smoking

Additional Heart Health Resources

Warning signs of heart attack, stroke & cardiac arrest

Million Hearts campaign from February 2017

Heart Age Predictor Using BMI

Test your heart failure IQ

New high blood pressure guidelines issued by American Heart Association

Study points to rising risk factors for stroke

Know stroke signs, use wellness programs to lower stroke risk factors

Fighting high cholesterol: Diet, exercise and workplace wellness coaching can help!

Strokes are a growing risk for younger people

08
Dec . 2017

Study points to rising risk factors for stroke

  • by Julie Ferguson
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  • with 0 Comment
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  • in Medical conditions, Research

Despite increased focus on stroke prevention and efforts to make the public aware of the conditions that can lead to strokes, risk factors for stroke are increasing, neurologists say. High blood pressure, diabetes, smoking, and drug....Read More

01
Dec . 2017

New high blood pressure guidelines issued by American Heart Association

  • by Julie Ferguson
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  • with 0 Comment
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  • in Research

Is your blood pressure through the roof these days? You aren't alone. Based on new high blood pressure guidelines published by the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology, almost half of US....Read More

16
Nov . 2017

Avoid the creeping menace of holiday weight gain!

  • by Julie Ferguson
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  • with 0 Comment
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  • in Uncategorized

Welcome to holiday weight gain season, which kicks off sometime around October (think Halloween candy), gathers steam in Thanksgiving, and peaks over the December holiday season. Researchers and health pundits vary in estimating the average....Read More

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